Indian Style Obeah Pon Di Roc……JA Obeah Sympathisers A Lick Out!!!!

Is long time I an I a talk bout di Indian dem soap opera pon di TV wid di voice wey sound like di living jingle bell pon crack.  Di way dem act pon demdeh soap opera u can si sey obeah is front line and centre. What is more alarming is how wi Jamaican people get excited wen di show a run and become caught up.  So the verdict is out by the visitors or residents on the Roc who have done their homework and is well pleased based on our participation.  Astrology…………they got a pass defining the practice. as such.  Many well thinking Jamaicans already know that is the living obeah operating in full swing here.

There is no denying that obeah was passed down to us from the Continent of Africa as majority of blacks were deported to the Islands.  Nevertheless, I will say every country on Planet Earth practices some form of obeah just called by a different name centuries upon centuries ago.    Humans regardless of race, colour, class or creed always want to believe that they are in total control of their destiny; at least every aspect of it including death and rebirth.  If you are in control of your own destiny, then chances are you can control another.

While some are anti anything ‘black’, when it comes on to obeah, astrology, witchcraft, your choice of name, I am of the view that persons who believe in that type of realm will go to anyone whether black, blue, white, yellow or green.  What we have on the Roc is the up towner wid money who will choose with utmost confidence their obeah contact.  Spiritual adviser, they may call them.  The in between may gravitate to the foreign ones, again undercover is the intention, as you really do not want to advertise that you dabble in such.  The down towners who do not give a damn what anyone thinks, will mek u know sey dem ago tie up u what it’s what it’s not.  They buy their oils………………..oil fi dis and oil fi dat; all drink pigeon blood and sleep ina coffin mi here.  So mankind has and will always be caught up in such practices.

The Indians have taken it to a different level by advertising on TV and radio finding a lucrative nest egg on the Island.  Our traditional obeah practitioners use their own means outside of such public advertisement spending not that much money as the Indians do.  Radio and television ads are not cheap!!!.  If you are running classifieds with the frequency as they do, in addition to the space where the ‘obeah’ service is meted out, I daresay money affi a mek in order to be consistent.  From the looks of it the Indians are consistent in their advertisements.  Who is making money?  It is obvious………………so who do you expect to clamp down on this?  Do you not know that people in high places dabble in a bit of obeah too?

While the law exists, when have we been able to enforce it with vigour?  How many obeah practitioners have been brought before the Courts????  We know where many of the obeah tools are sold.   We even know those who call themselves spiritual advisers to be the living obeah man or ooman, yet we allow them to peddle their trade.  Demand is even higher in these times and the Indians are here to capitalise.  Once you have a foreign accent and ur obeah tun up differently to what we are accustomed to on the Roc, u nuh expect sey di people ago flock them?  Jamaicans love all things foreign.

I can tell you the powers of be will do no such thing to bring these practitioners to justice whether locals, Indians, or other foreigners who choose to come here and bring their evil practice.  

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I am the legal copyright owner of the  material provided on this blog. Therefore such cannot be used, reprinted without the consent of the owner  The material provided is purely for entertainment purposes and not recommended for readers to treat as gospel.  Information that is not of my opinion is readily available as the source of content is accessible.  I reserve the right to shut down this blog, change the focus at my discretion.  At no time will I share personal contact information to any entity, company or platform. 

Any letters to the editor, tweets, emails will be used as feedback, reference for commentary  if deemed necessary.  The writer of those will be the owner.

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OBEAH OR ASTROLOGY?

Concern raised over rise in number of Indian astrologers advertising their talent in Jamaican media

(Jamaica Observer) Sunday, December 17, 2017 50 Comments

YOU see the advertisements promising remedies to all your problems — sickness, wealth, legal matters — they fix it all. But are Indian astrologers operating in Jamaica in contravention of the nation’s laws?

“The way they advertise themselves and the services they offer is an assertion of superior capabilities. In other words, they are saying that they are capable of doing things that a doctor cannot do, a lawyer cannot do and other persons cannot do, but somehow, were you to visit them, they can do it,” said veteran attorney-at-law Linton Gordon.

The astrologers proclaim their ability to provide solutions to sexual problems, enemies, children, special problems, protection, financial issues, bad luck, education, promotion, career troubles, addiction, depression, childlessness, prediction of one’s future, healing illnesses, better love life or marriage, getting a visa and much more — abilities some would argue are similar to that of an obeah worker, whose practices are outlawed in Jamaica.

Obeah, as described by Kenneth Bilby and Jerome Handler in a research paper titled Obeah: Healing and Protection in West Indian Slave Life, is “a wide variety of beliefs and practices involving the control or channelling of supernatural or spiritual forces, usually for socially beneficial ends such as treating illness, bringing good fortune, protecting against harm, and avenging wrongs”.

They point out that many conceptions of obeah “stress its antisocial and evil nature as witchcraft or sorcery”.

Similarly, lecturer at The University of the West Indies, Dr Ajamu Nangwaya, told the Jamaica Observer that the practice, which was brought to the island during slavery from Africa, is associated with evil doing.

“It’s coming out of an African tradition where everything that happens to people is related to some other external agency; that is, people manipulating nature to make something bad happen to you or if you’d like something good to happen to you, you have to appeal to the gods or engage in magic or obeah practices to get the type of outcome you want,” Nangwaya, who lectures in Rastafarian studies at the Institute of Caribbean Studies, stated.

The Obeah Act (1898) defines the practice as having the same meaning as myalism, which, according to Nathaniel Murrell’s book Afro-Caribbean Religions is an Afro-Jamaican religious “institution with a belief system, a dance ritual, an initiatory rite tradition, and a pharmacopoeia for herbal and spiritual healing”.

A self-proclaimed obeah man contacted by the Sunday Observer said his rituals offer a solution to people’s troubles.

The man, who professed his services include love bonding, protecting partners from cheating in relationships, quick money and removal of sickness, said he has been practising since childhood as he “grew up with people who do spiritual work”.

The 50-year-old explained love bonding to be something that compels an individual to another, which he explained is synonymous to “tying someone” as referenced in the Jamaican culture; while quick money has to do with causing a person to earn more money in their line of work.

He asserted his abilities and expressed scepticism toward the Indian astrologers.

“Spiritual work have to do with something that is inside of you…I think they (Indian astrologers) have to study to know how to read palm from a book or something that teach you how to study the palm, but I don’t think they have the natural gift all that much.”

The Indian astrologers who were contacted declined to speak with the Sunday Observer.

The Oxford Dictionary defines astrology as the study of the positions of stars and the movement of planets in the belief that they influence human affairs. It is therefore a science based on astronomy which deals with the effects of planetary movements on lives.

The television advertisements from persons purporting to be Indian astrologers have flooded local television in recent times.

Interestingly, though advertising services, these astrologers never provide an exact address for their business places.

One advertises his address based on his proximity to Half-Way-Tree, stating it’s located “two minutes’ walk” outside of the parish capital; while another announces his business’ location based on its closeness to PriceSmart, a membership shopping establishment on Red Hills Road.

“So what we’re having now is that these persons have come on the scene in Jamaica and they are now carrying out activities…and they have become so bold, open, and established that the waves of advertisements are on our televisions, with these persons declaring all these things that they are able to do and perform which amount to possible breaches of the Medical Act, possible breaches of the Pharmacy Act, and highly likely to be breaching the Obeah Act,” Gordon said.

He explained that the astrologers could be in breach of the Obeah Act because it states that persons who go about fraudulently putting themselves forward as capable of carrying out supernatural acts can be charged. He said their advertisements suggest they have supernatural powers, meaning more than the ordinary person.

“There is the Medical Act, which provides that for you to practise medicine you must be a fit and proper person who has been granted a qualifying certificate and registered as a medical practitioner and given a number. In the absence of those qualifications you should not be out there offering to solve [a] person’s medical problems — but they are doing that by saying if you have any type of ailment, come to me and I can cure you,” he reasoned.

“The third Act is perhaps only breached when there is an actual visit, and it is the Pharmacy Act, because under the Pharmacy Act you are not supposed to be distributing medication to persons unless you are a duly registered pharmacist,” the attorney added, noting it is punishable by law.

The Pharmacy Act defines a drug as any substance or mixture of substances manufactured, sold or represented for use in the diagnosis, treatment, mitigation or prevention of a disease, disorder, abnormal physical state or the symptoms thereof in man or animal; (b) restoring, correcting or modifying organic functions in man or animal; (c) disinfection in premises in which food is manufactured, prepared, preserved, packaged or stored for sale or sold, or for the control of vermin or insects in such premises.

The Obeah Act states that a person practising obeah can be imprisoned up to a year with hard labour.

Under the Pharmacy Act, an individual who is not a pharmacist but compounds, dispenses or sells any drug at a place not registered as a pharmacy can be fined on summary conviction before a parish judge up to $500,000, or be imprisoned with or without hard labour for up to six months.

Section 14 (2c) of the Medical Act states that “any person who, not being registered as a medical practitioner under this Act, advertises or holds himself out as a person authorised or qualified to practise medicine” is liable on summary conviction before a parish judge to pay up to a $1-million fine and/or imprisonment for a term not more than a year.

“Why would we criminalise something that’s African in nature, but something that has an association with different racial religious experiences? We look on it and essentially we just ignore it, we look the other way,” Nangwaya asked.

“That’s something that is very troubling in our country, where the tendency in our culture [is that] anything too black not too good, and obeah is one of the blackest religions,” the UWI lecturer stated.

Gordon also raised concern that it does not appear anything is being done to clamp down on the proliferation of ‘astrologers’ islandwide.

“Some members of our security forces should visit them incognito and get a clear understanding of what they are doing, because they might be making millions of dollars conducting illegal activities and practices in breach of the Medical Act, the Pharmacy Act and the Obeah Act,” he proposed.

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Illegal Immigrants In JA?? – Heaven On Earth They Say

Yes sah…………….this is music to my ears as it forces me to take stock and think outside of my own disgust at times.  My own complaints which are certainly valid to the viewpoint or better still through the eyes of a foreigner.  Often times we never stop to think that what we dread in our own country could be perceived as minors to that foreigner.  Which country did that foreigner come from?  What was their life like there?  As we say another man’s garbage is another’s treasure, the same rings through to logistics.  So with that we have our fair share of illegals in Jamroc and by all accounts wi a run di amnesty programme.

While America and Europe is facing the migrant’s dilemma, I wonder what JA would look like in another 25-30 years.  Maybe our focus will not be centered solely on the Asians, rather those we see from the Africa’s and other regions that we never thought of.  Why would someone leave the USA, Europe and come to JA, with the view of taking up full time residence?  Again, we focus on the majority and that will never change, however, the minority in value once spread across several regions will eventually become significant.  So what will Jamaica look like in another 3 decades?  Our motto says out of many one people and I will suspect out of many 1 language in times to come.

I would like to believe that in granting residence status to the illegals, the proper vetting similar to what the USA does in their immigration process be exercised.  Affidavit of support, skilled based or not, previous criminal records, health records.  Finally a cost in the hundreds of thousands, dollars. After all, you are not seeking asylum where we would have to deport you.  Not that we are uncaring but wi nuh ave nuh monie fi tek care a business.  An if u can barely feed uself mi nuh si how u a go feed other people.  Not to mention di haspital called public.

The bottom line is providing you will become an asset and not a drain or sewer to this country, I say welcome aboard as I for one believe the doors to a country should not be closed as immigration is integration, integration is inclusion, inclusion is equality and equality is the greatest form of democracy.  Enjoy your heaven in Jamroc…………….

Disclaimer

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All information provided on this blog is read by you of your own risk.  Any material extracted it is done of your own free will.

I am the legal copyright owner of the  material provided on this blog. Therefore such cannot be used, reprinted without the consent of the owner  The material provided is purely for entertainment purposes and not recommended for readers to treat as gospel.  Information that is not of my opinion is readily available as the source of content is accessible.  I reserve the right to shut down this blog, change the focus at my discretion.  At no time will I share personal contact information to any entity, company or platform. 

Any letters to the editor, tweets, emails will be used as feedback, reference for commentary  if deemed necessary.  The writer of those will be the owner.

Email fireicedsa@hotmail.com with your comments

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‘Heaven on Earth’

New Jamaican citizens overjoyed

(Jamaica Observer) Friday, December 15, 2017 32 Comments

 Hugs, broad smiles, and a sense of pride marked the celebratory atmosphere among 47 people who were yesterday granted Jamaican citizenship during a ceremony at Police Officers’ Club on Hope Road in St Andrew.

Nigerian entrepreneur Moruf Uveen was simply overjoyed.

“I have been here from 2001,” he told the Jamaica Observer. “I fell in love with the country over the years. It’s a very beautiful island. It’s like a heaven on Earth — other than the crime that we are seeing. Sometimes I just picture this island without the crime. Lovely!”

Another native of the African continent, Shola Banidela, said she was filled with pride and a great sense of responsibility as a new citizen of Jamaica. A nurse by profession, she set foot on Jamaican soil in 2011 and wants to continue to expand her roots here.

“I realise it’s a lot like home… when I started cooking Jamaican foods, I take it to my place of work and my colleagues said, ‘Wow, so you’ve become Jamaican.’ Just coming here, it makes me feel like I have been given a responsibility. I’m now a Jamaican and I need to put in my best,” she told the Observer.

Miguel de La Cruz Navarro, a Cuban by birth, was equally euphoric.

“I have always loved Jamaica,” he said, beaming from ear to ear. “In Cuba we used to hear a lot of Jamaican music… I always said I want to go and visit Jamaica, and the dream came through. I’m married to a Jamaican citizen. I came to Jamaica and then after working here I said okay, ‘I want to come to Jamaica. I want to help to build this country.’ I’m building my life here in Jamaica.”

Yesterday’s ceremony was the first public event of its kind held by the Passport, Immigration and Citizenship Agency (PICA) in the country.

The group included people from Africa, Asia, the United Kingdom, the United States, and other countries.

Chief executive officer of PICA, Andrew Wynter, said that this was the largest group of individuals to be granted citizenship on one occasion, and that since the inception of the agency 10 years ago, more than 30,000 people have become Jamaican citizens.

Describing the occasion as a watershed moment, Wynter said PICA intends to reach out to relatives of Jamaicans in the diaspora who are also eligible to become citizens of the island.

National Security Minister Robert Montague urged the new citizens to apply for crucial national evidence of their identity such as Taxpayer Registration Number, voter identification, and Jamaican passports. He also urged them to join in the fight against crime by downloading the police Stay Alert app which, he said, now has 137,000 downloads.

Montague also announced that the Government will be embarking on an amnesty in early 2018 aimed at regularising the status of 15,000 to 20,000 foreigners living illegally in Jamaica.

This decision, he said, follows a recent submission he made to Cabinet on the matter.

“We have many persons who came here illegally. They have lived here, married, and have children and grandchildren, and have never sorted out their status. We want to give them an opportunity to (become legal) Jamaican citizens,” Montague said.

He noted that there are many foreigners who, although living illegally in Jamaica for some time, have nonetheless contributed significantly to Jamaica’s development.

“…We want to give them that opportunity to become permanent residents and use this as a step towards citizenship,” he said.

Montague pointed out that other countries have extended this gesture to Jamaicans and, in this regard, “it is the least we can do for those who have helped to build this economy”.

The ceremony was also used by PICA to launch its drop-box service, which is being implemented in partnership with international couriers DHL. The initiative will allow customers to submit applications at PICA’s head office in Kingston without joining lines, with the option of having DHL deliver their passports.

The service is available only to adults renewing their passports, minors, and first-time applicants who have had their forms checked by PICA officers at the agency’s outposts in other parishes. The drop-box facility will provide envelopes in which the applicants will deposit their application forms and all original required documents. A receipt will be issued as proof of deposit of the application and the attendant documents. The turnaround time for this facility is seven days. People whose passports are lost, damaged, or unavailable cannot use the service.

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Wha Dis Affi Do Wid Wi??? – Wi Eat A Food From Way Ova Deh?????

U eva si mi dying trial?????  Wha really a gwaan in disya country.  A ton load a gun wey dem seize which was directly heading to Jamdown.  Published to reveal that the consignment was addressed to a former employee of a PNP councillor here on the Island.  Wi have human trafficking a tun up ina Ocho Rios.  Garbage caan collect cross di Island as dem claim nuh money nuh deh bout fi clean up people’s waste.  Den wi hear sey wi fi keep u yaard clean and get rid a garbage due to viruses wey mosquito love fi carry.  Nuh matter wey u do, try nuh bun no rubbish as dat wi caas odder problem.  Wi nuh ave nuh road fi drive pon yahso as di road dem from Negril to Morant Point look like how it used to ina di 1980’s-1990’s.  Wid all a wey wi a deal wid, Senate a ask question bout POTUS and Jerusalem now being the capital of Israel.

Do we have any trade agreement in that region?  Have we borrowed any money from that region?  Do we import even sweetie or chocolate from that region, let me break it down a bit?  Why should it be any business of ours, resulting in us having any opinion on that decision?  Tell me, is or was there some trade agreement in the pipeline?  Wi plan fi build one all-inclusive Muslim resort yahso?  Enlighten mi nuh!!  A fraid oonu fraid sey war ago start wid USA an oonu frequent flyer mileage ago cancel out.  I put it to you that we should be concerned about the war wey a gwaan yahso and the war of all wars pon dis yah Island wey ago wipe wi affa di map, if oono nuh deal wid oono own!!!!!!!  Any day this country is labelled a terrorist region especially like how Mr Mandeh is deemed such by US authorities after recently being extradited; none of us will be able to hop pon any plane fi visit family, friends or do business in a di USA.

You know something, it is one thing to fass ina your neighbours business when dem live next door to you.  It is entirely a different cup of tea fi fass in a people business wey u nuh know outside of TV and paper wey live outside of wey u 4 legs or motor vehicle can carry u.  Kiss mi rawtid teeth!!!!!!!!!!

Disclaimer

—————-
All information provided on this blog is read by you of your own risk.  Any material extracted it is done of your own free will.

I am the legal copyright owner of the  material provided on this blog. Therefore such cannot be used, reprinted without the consent of the owner  The material provided is purely for entertainment purposes and not recommended for readers to treat as gospel.  Information that is not of my opinion is readily available as the source of content is accessible.  I reserve the right to shut down this blog, change the focus at my discretion.  At no time will I share personal contact information to any entity, company or platform. 

Any letters to the editor, tweets, emails will be used as feedback, reference for commentary  if deemed necessary.  The writer of those will be the owner.

Email fireicedsa@hotmail.com with your comments

=====================================================

KD Knight seeks Jamaica’s position on Trump’s Jerusalem declaration

KD KnightKD Knight

Questions were raised in the Senate on Friday morning about the position of the Jamaican Government on the symbolic declaration by United States President, Donald Trump, that Jerusalem is the capital of Israel.

The declaration, made on Wednesday, has been condemned as “reckless” by several world leaders who argue that it will not do anything to advance the peace process between Israel and Palestine.

It has also resulted in protests across the Middle East, with more than 100 Palestinians said to be injured by the end of the day on Thursday.

When Opposition Senator, KD Knight, a former Foreign Affairs Minister, asked his Government counterpart, Senator Ruel Reid, who is the Minister of Information, what the position of the Jamaican government is, Knight was in turn asked by Acting President of the Senate, Aubyn Hill, whether the declaration by President Trump in fact represented a change.

Knight responded by telling Senator Hill that East Jerusalem is the capital of Palestine, and that the Trump declaration now makes all of Jerusalem the capital of the Jewish state.

Senator Reid indicated that the Minister of Foreign Affairs, Senator Kamina Johnson Smith, who is also the Leader of Government Business in the Senate, was off the island. He assured the Upper House that a response will be provided by next Friday.

Johnson Smith left the island on the weekend to attend the 106th Session of the Council of Ministers of African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) Group of States. The meeting is being held in Brussels, Belgium.

A statement from her ministry said the meeting will, among other things, discuss development finance co-operation, trade in commodities, the status of EPA negotiations and implementation, and ongoing preparations for the ACP/EU post-Cotonou negotiations.

“These ACP meetings are important, as the Group continues to evaluate the impact on the economies of the member states of the trade in commodities, such as sugar and bananas; the implementation of the EPAs, and continue to establish the negotiating structure for the Cotonou successor arrangement,” Johnson Smith said.

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