JA’s Airspace – Let The Games Begin – Update

With the winter tourist season fast approaching, how will this play out?  How safe is Jamaica’s air space, and can we afford to continue on this trajectory.  This ‘sick out’ is a common position taken when various workers of the public sector are totally dissatisfied with their working conditions and remuneration.

The teachers have finally come to an agreement with the latest offer which by the way is exactly what the government had proposed sometime ago.  So we ask the question, what was all the song and dance really about?  At the end of the day, time is money and if wasted who really suffers?  Air traffic controller’s job description is not a ‘cushy’ one and in the name of safety it would bode well if some form of resolution could be forthwith.  I have no qualms in stating that there are many working in the public sector whose role should be made redundant as they are collecting money under false pretenses.  Their production level is naught and their sole purpose is to turn up to work to collect that pay cheque.  Air traffic controller’s role is serious business.  Look to the skies and ask yourself what level of competence and what quality tools would you want that person to have at their disposal when next you are about to land on home turf. 


 

Jamaican airspace to close at 9pm tonight as air traffic controllers report sick

(Jamaica Gleaner)Saturday | August 22, 2015 

Jamaica’s airspace is to be closed at 9 o’clock this evening as air traffic controllers call in sick in an apparent protest over wage issues and the failure of the Jamaica Civil Aviation Authority (JCAA) to address a number of problems they say have been significantly affecting their performance.

This is the second straight night the Jamaica Civil Aviation Authority (JCAA) has been forced to close Jamaica’s airspace because air traffic controllers have failed to turn up for work.

Between last night and this morning, several aircraft had to be diverted from Jamaican airspace for the same reason.

Meanwhile, Director General of the JCAA, Nari Singh, says the airspace should reopen at 7 o’clock tomorrow morning.

He also said although adequate notices were dispatched to the various airlines operating in Jamaican airspace, the were disruptions this morning with several flights being cancelled.

However, one executive member of the Jamaica Air Traffic Controllers’ Association has denied suggestions that his members are staging a protest and have defied a back to work order issued by the Industrial Disputes Tribunal (IDT) last night.

General Secretary of the association Lenroy Morrison told The Gleaner-Power 106 News Centre that his members called in sick with different complaints and that this was communicated to the IDT.

As a result, he says it is incorrect to say his members disobeyed the IDT.

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Usain Bolt – When He Speaks As The Time Draws ‘Nigh’ I’m Pumped Up!!!

It is here, all eyes will be on the biggest, most charismatic track and field star of all times, Usain Bolt.  Admittedly so, I have refrained from commenting on his form, knowing that a man of his stature knows exactly what is at stake and need no interference from us mortals who can only imagine what being the fastest man in the World really means.

Bolt has nothing to prove in respect of his ability to win on the big stage. He has shown us exactly who he is on the track and will hold a place in history for that accomplishment.  Bolt I would suspect is aiming for ‘greatness’ in his chosen profession.  When you talk about the greatest in their fields which encompasses charisma, electrifying performances, hysteria, a few names that come to my mind are the likes of Bob Marley, Michael Jackson, Michael Jordon, Mohammad Ali, Michael Schumacher, Brian Lara.  Usain Bolt is that guy whose name is a household one that divides race and culture.  I can only back one man to get to the finish line ahead of the pack, and that is ‘Bolt’.


 

#BEIJING2015: I’m in wonderful shape — Bolt

(Jamaica Observer) Saturday, August 22, 2015  

 
 (Photo: AFP)

BEIJING, China (AFP) — Usain Bolt bids to retain his title as the world’s fastest man on day two of the world athletics championships on Sunday.

The Jamaican easily qualified for the 100 metres semi-final along with American rival Justin Gatlin, who set the fastest qualifying time of 9.83sec.

But all eyes will be on Jamaican superstar Bolt, who faces a serious challenge from American Gatlin in a blockbuster clash in Beijing, where Bolt famously blasted to triple gold at the 2008 Olympics.

“I was just trying to execute and save as much energy as possible,” Bolt said after winning his heat. “I’m in wonderful shape.”

Gatlin, 33, who has twice failed doping tests in the past, has clocked this season’s fastest time of 9.74 seconds, while world record holder Bolt returned from injury with a 9.87 in London last month.

Such has been the towering Jamaican’s complete dominance of sprinting since 2008 that astonishingly the only time he failed to land a major title was when he was disqualified for a false start in the 100m in Daegu four years ago.

Bolt’s eye-popping world record of 9.58, set in Berlin in 2009, would appear safe but with allegations of widespread doping engulfing the sport, his showdown with Gatlin is being seen by some as a symbolic struggle of light versus dark.

Jamaica’s double Olympic champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce begins her quest to win an unprecedented third women’s 100m world title in the heats later today.

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Your Feeling Heart by Dr Tony Vendryes

Heart disease is still the number one killer worldwide. The human heart is an extraordinary muscular pump that automatically pumps blood around the body through thousands of miles of blood vessels. From while you were still in your mother’s womb until you die, your heart will beat more than 3.5 billion times and will pump more than 500 million gallons of blood. In health, the heart does this awesome job with effortless ease. No man-made pump rivals the heart’s exquisite abilities.

Ancient traditions have passed down a strong belief in the intelligence of the heart. Early research into heart intelligence by two physiologists, John and Beatrice Lacey, showed that the heart actually communicates with the brain in ways that greatly affect how we see and respond to the world in which we live.

Only 25 years ago, heart specialist Dr Andrew Armour introduced the term ‘heart-brain’ and explained that the heart possessed a complex nervous system that functioned like a brain.

Here are some interesting facts that modern research has now confirmed about the heart:

– The heart has its own independent nervous system known as “the brain in the heart”.

– The heart starts beating in the unborn foetus before the brain has been formed, and our emotional brain then develops long before the rational one.

– The heart-brain constantly sends signals to the head-brain, creating a two-way communication system between heart and brain.

– The heart directs and aligns many systems in the body so that they can function in harmony with one another.

– The heart also sends us emotional and intuitive signals to help us live more wisely.
 

EMOTIONS AND THE HEART 

Research conducted by the United States-based non-profit organisation HeartMATH has shown that negative emotions put the nervous system out of balance, and when that happens heart rhythms are disturbed and the heartbeat becomes irregular. This puts stress on the physical heart and other organs and can cause serious problems, including sudden death.

Many of us are aware of heart attacks and sudden death being caused by a blockage to the blood vessels in the heart. The drug companies are hard at work convincing us that cholesterol-lowering drugs will solve that problem. On the other hand, most of us are unaware that an irregular heartbeat is another frequent cause of heart attacks and death.

HeartMATH research suggests that the more we learn to tune in to our heart’s intelligence, the wiser and more balanced our emotions become. Without the guiding influence of the heart, we fall prey to reflex emotions such as insecurity, anger, fear, guilt, and blame, as well as other unhealthy reactions and behaviours.

The current epidemic of high blood pressure is influenced in a big way by these unrecognised emotions.
 

STRESS AND HEART HEALTH 

Stress is now a familiar household word often used to blame mental lapses, emotional outbursts, headaches, other unexplained pains, or even major illnesses. From a body-mind perspective, our emotional responses are the main ingredients in the experience of stress. It is our feelings like anxiety, irritation, frustration, being overwhelmed, lack of control, hopelessness that arise when we describe ourselves as stressed.

HeartMATH research indicates that emotions, even more than just thoughts, produce the physical changes in our bodies (and hearts) that occur with stress. Negative emotions do disrupt heart health. Conversely, the emotions we often identify as positive facilitate a healthy heart and optimise the body’s natural healing ability.
 

CARING YOUR HEART 

In the past, I have extolled the benefits to your heart of a proper diet, exercise, weight management, and nutritional supplements, cellular nutrition, vitamins B complex and C, magnesium, the omega 3 fatty acids, Coenzyme Q10, Hawthorne and L carnithine, and chelation therapy, to name some.

I still do, but please remember that stress and negative emotions can have deadly effects on the heart. Specific stress management tools like Yoga Nidra, meditation, relaxation therapy, hypnosis, breathing techniques, and biofeedback are strategies that have a major role to play in maintaining a healthy heart as well as in correcting pre-existing heart problems. My relaxation training CD, A Time to Relax, has proved to be a very useful stress-management tool.

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Your Feeling Heart……………………………

(Jamaica Gleaner)Tuesday | August 18, 2015
 
Heart disease is still the number one killer worldwide. The human heart is an extraordinary muscular pump that automatically pumps blood around the body through thousands of miles of blood vessels. From while you were still in your mother’s womb until you die, your heart will beat more than 3.5 billion times and will pump more than 500 million gallons of blood. In health, the heart does this awesome job with effortless ease. No man-made pump rivals the heart’s exquisite abilities.

Ancient traditions have passed down a strong belief in the intelligence of the heart. Early research into heart intelligence by two physiologists, John and Beatrice Lacey, showed that the heart actually communicates with the brain in ways that greatly affect how we see and respond to the world in which we live.

Only 25 years ago, heart specialist Dr Andrew Armour introduced the term ‘heart-brain’ and explained that the heart possessed a complex nervous system that functioned like a brain.

Here are some interesting facts that modern research has now confirmed about the heart:

– The heart has its own independent nervous system known as “the brain in the heart”.

– The heart starts beating in the unborn foetus before the brain has been formed, and our emotional brain then develops long before the rational one.

– The heart-brain constantly sends signals to the head-brain, creating a two-way communication system between heart and brain.

– The heart directs and aligns many systems in the body so that they can function in harmony with one another.

– The heart also sends us emotional and intuitive signals to help us live more wisely.

 

EMOTIONS AND THE HEART

 

Research conducted by the United States-based non-profit organisation HeartMATH has shown that negative emotions put the nervous system out of balance, and when that happens heart rhythms are disturbed and the heartbeat becomes irregular. This puts stress on the physical heart and other organs and can cause serious problems, including sudden death.

Many of us are aware of heart attacks and sudden death being caused by a blockage to the blood vessels in the heart. The drug companies are hard at work convincing us that cholesterol-lowering drugs will solve that problem. On the other hand, most of us are unaware that an irregular heartbeat is another frequent cause of heart attacks and death.

HeartMATH research suggests that the more we learn to tune in to our heart’s intelligence, the wiser and more balanced our emotions become. Without the guiding influence of the heart, we fall prey to reflex emotions such as insecurity, anger, fear, guilt, and blame, as well as other unhealthy reactions and behaviours.

The current epidemic of high blood pressure is influenced in a big way by these unrecognised emotions.

 

STRESS AND HEART HEALTH

 

Stress is now a familiar household word often used to blame mental lapses, emotional outbursts, headaches, other unexplained pains, or even major illnesses. From a body-mind perspective, our emotional responses are the main ingredients in the experience of stress. It is our feelings like anxiety, irritation, frustration, being overwhelmed, lack of control, hopelessness that arise when we describe ourselves as stressed.

HeartMATH research indicates that emotions, even more than just thoughts, produce the physical changes in our bodies (and hearts) that occur with stress. Negative emotions do disrupt heart health. Conversely, the emotions we often identify as positive facilitate a healthy heart and optimise the body’s natural healing ability.

 

CARING YOUR HEART

 

In the past, I have extolled the benefits to your heart of a proper diet, exercise, weight management, and nutritional supplements, cellular nutrition, vitamins B complex and C, magnesium, the omega 3 fatty acids, Coenzyme Q10, Hawthorne and L carnithine, and chelation therapy, to name some.

I still do, but please remember that stress and negative emotions can have deadly effects on the heart. Specific stress management tools like Yoga Nidra, meditation, relaxation therapy, hypnosis, breathing techniques, and biofeedback are strategies that have a major role to play in maintaining a healthy heart as well as in correcting pre-existing heart problems. My relaxation training CD, A Time to Relax, has proved to be a very useful stress-management tool.

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JUTC – ‘A DIS U CALL SALT’

What is going on here?  Within the last 18 months, how many buses have we heard of experiencing serious mechanical faults while passengers are on board?   Are theses buses road worthy?  It appears we have a dwindling fleet.  No wonder we have citizens risking their lives by taking the ‘shotta’ taxis to and fro.

Personally I can still remember the days of JOS bus with both conductor and conductress nicely clad and peaceful journeys experienced.  Compared to the JUTC, the JOS bus bares no resemblance in terms of stature namely colour and appearance.  One thing is for sure, the good ‘ole’ JOS bus from my recollection was more reliable.  Speeding was a non issue unlike the JUTC but in all fairness that is down to personnel and I guess when you are choosing from ‘worse, worserer and wosest’, what we have is all we have.


 

JUTC bus engulfs in smoke, passengers forced to evacuate

(Jamaica Gleaner) Published:Tuesday | August 18, 2015
 

Passengers on-board a Jamaica Urban Transit Company bus making its way from Spanish Town to Half-Way Tree were forced to flee the vehicle this morning after it became engulfed in smoke.

The bus was on Washington Boulevard in St Andrew when the incident occurred. 

JUTC’s marketing and communications manager, Clinton Clarke says the smoke was caused by a mechanical issue with the brakes.

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Cutting Cane With Machetes? – Black On Black Slavery in Jamaica!!!!

Hypocrites we are……………In this day and age we are still using this method of cutting canes for production.  Who are the ones averse to terminating this methodology?   Do you not have the belief that our workers can be trained, upgraded and become proficient in the use of machineries?  Are you really saying that they are stupid and that is all they can do in that sector?

I call this black on black slavery that is allowed to continue irrespective of not only losses incurred in that sector but the manipulation of the educated upon those considered less than.  To stifle true growth and modernisation we use the same system of mental slavery giving the false impression that the said ‘slaves’ will be worse off with progress. There are many ills to our dilemma in this country; unfortunately there are some that go straight to the root cause of our dysfunctional political system.  As very few our politicians prior to politics have any ‘cash’ wealth to speak of, Parties rely on funding from heavy hitters.  In turn they have to budget from the very same funding to feed those who care less about the issues and moreso about tribalism. So if we look to those most opposed to modernisation of certain sectors, it can be only logical to look at their political affiliation.  After all, no matter who is the ruling Party, there are those that must be given right of passage so to speak.


 

Stop manual cutting of cane in Jamaica, Cuban official urges

Socialist giant stepping up production again after many years of slump

BY HG HELPS Editor-at-Large helpsh@jamaicaobserver.com

(Jamaica Observer) Sunday, August 16, 2015     47 Comments

 
 
 
A combine harvester working in a Cuban sugar cane field.

HAVANA, Cuba – Manual cutting of cane is not the way for Jamaica’s sugar industry to continue if it is serious about becoming profitable, one senior Cuban official has said.

Rafael Suarez Rivacoba, the Director of International Relations for AZCUBA Group, which manages the affairs of the sugar industry here, suggested that it was a waste of time for workers in the Jamaica sugar industry to be using machetes to cut cane in this day and age. Instead, he is suggesting that if sugar producing companies in Jamaica want to reduce their overhead costs and realise profits, they must move towards mechanisation.

“If a country’s sugar industry is going to develop, the manual cutting of cane has to stop. Cutting cane is very tough and cane is a very hard crop,” Rivacoba told the Jamaica Observer in an interview here.

Instead, Rivacoba believes in complete mechanisation of the industry, insisting that field operations should be done by using combine harvesters, even if it means that some people would lose their jobs as manual cane cutters.

“There is no money to be made by putting people in the field to cut cane,” he said. “Cuba and Australia are among the first sugar producing countries to use combine harvesters in their field operations. Our operations are now 100 per cent mechanised, as manual cutting of cane stopped by the middle of the 1980s.

“Right now, we are working with a Chinese company to jointly produce more combine harvesters and we are importing some machinery from Brazil,” he said.

The opinion is not likely to go down well with some Jamaican sugar cane interests, who are steeped in tradition that cane cutters should be the ones chopping cane plants with machetes for milling.

Only recently, the jobs of several cane cutters at St Thomas Sugar Company were made redundant, as the company, which is managed by the Seprod Group, attempts to streamline its operations and boost efficiency. Reports have suggested that the majority of the workers will be rehired as contract workers, meaning that the system of manual harvesting will continue at that, and other estates, all of which have been privatised in recent years.

Jamaica’s overall sugar production fluctuates annually, but averages around 150,000 tonnes in recent years, falling short of set targets most times.

The matter of non-mechanisation of the Jamaican sugar industry’s field operations in particular, has been a thorny subject since the 1970s, when special interests suggested that combine harvesters, used by many countries of Europe and North America to reap various crops, ought to be introduced into mainstream agriculture in Jamaica, starting with the sugar industry.

But boardroom verbal clashes between those for and against resulted in the status quo of hand chopping of cane remaining intact.

Members of Parliament who represented workers in sugar cane producing communities also strongly objected to any move to mechanise the industry, as it would mean displacement of jobs for several thousand cane cutters, many of whom, the politicians argued, would not be in a position to do anything else.

Rivacoba maintained that any refusal to mechanise the industry would result in organisations involved not making profits.

In Cuba, the industry has reached a position of self-sufficiency. The island has managed to run its 56 sugar factories efficiently and the industry has been increasing its annual production in recent years, following a huge slump in the 1990s.

At one time, up to the 2002-2003 harvest, Cuba had 156 factories in operation. Close to two million hectares of land were under cultivation. Production, which at one time stood at up to eight million tonnes, dipped with the shutting down of 100 factories and the land used to grow the crop dropped to 800,000 hectares spread across 13 of the 16 provinces which produce the commodity.

Cuba for years enjoyed preferential markets and even had sugar quotas of between three and four million tonnes for the United States market alone. Before the Revolution in 1959, sugar formed 90 per cent of the island’s exports

Between three and four million tonnes were shipped to the US alone, but after 1959 things went on a downward path, despite the efforts of the then Soviet Union, China and countries in Eastern Europe to fill the breach. Even without US purchases, sugar continued to be the main economic earner for Cuba during the 1960s and 1970s, but the bombshell collapse of the Soviet Union during the 1990s dug a hole in the fortunes of the Caribbean island.

“We not only lost some of our markets for our sugar, but we also lost traditional markets for fertilizers, pesticides and other products,” Rivacoba said.

But things are stepping up again. Four years ago Cuba produced 1.2 million tonnes of the sweetener. It was then that authorities decided to start increasing cultivation, which has been working at achieving a 15 per cent growth per year for the last three years. Now, two million tonnes are being pushed out by the 56 factories.

Despite the low output, compared to what obtained decades ago, the industry’s crushing capacity is enough to produce up to four million tonnes in any one crop.

“We have the space to grow,” Rivacoba stated. “In four to five years we calculate to produce up to another five million tonnes, but again, that all depends on the international price being paid for sugar.”

The crystal is now trading at an average US 11 cents per pound on the international market.

As part of the industry’s self-sufficiency here, energy is derived from the burning of cane waste, known as bagasse, with steam being produced in boilers, which then goes to a generator to produce electricity. Therefore, the sugar industry does not have to be substituted by the State, as it depends on exports and domestic sales to pay the bills and realise a surplus.

This also comes despite another humbug, as only 10 per cent of the land under sugar cultivation is irrigated, posing challenges if there is inadequate rainfall between the reaping season that runs from November to April.

“We are looking for foreign capital to produce more and more energy,” Rivacoba said, underlining the fact that although Cuba as a country depends on imported oil, none is used in the running of the sugar industry.

“We in Cuba’s sugar industry need to produce more power to be injected into the national grid,” he reiterated.

And although at least one sugar factory in Jamaica still uses the colonial method of horses, donkeys and mules to help with transportation of canes, that is a thing of the past for this country, which relies on truck and rail carts to move cane around

Cuba also refines sugar but for the domestic market only.

 

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‘Warmington’ – Not A Role Model For Upcoming Young Men

There is absolutely nothing wrong in wanting to be alone.  In fact, it is your choice and your right and on that you can stand your ground.  On the other hand when you choose a career path such as Politics and actually become a Member of Parliament (MP), it is tantamount to an ‘oxymoron’ wanting to be alone and in public office.  Not only are you a MP, but you belong to a Party that has been in the wilderness far longer than was expected thus making seniors like yourself ‘prime meat’.  A MP of a party that creates scandals through design makes for good humour and that is where our ‘tabloids’ must position themselves.  When the comics are in town, you feature them, and you never seem to disappoint in that area.

 You have made your position very clear; as you reiterate that you are only concerned with the people of your Constituency.  What further message does the JLP needs to hear from you.  Clearly in your mind, it is your constituency alone that will take the JLP to victory and become the next governing party.  By that statement, you are of the mindset that you are a law unto yourself having no regard or respect for the JLP which should be bigger than the whole lot of you grippers.  The founding members of the JLP must be having a few choice words when they see the likes of you.  A Party Leader that you obviously have no respect for.  If you did, you would realise that your public spectacles would cause harm and not good for the party.  In fact, the enter leadership of the JLP you have no respect for.  Where does the ‘greater good for the party’ factors in?  Why do they allow a time bomb as yourself to decimate so often?  It must be that they enjoy the suicide mission that you are hell bent on taking the Party on.  Bad enough there is always some beef stewing in the JLP’s camp, and to add your unstable uncouthness to the mix is a recipe that ensures ‘forever out in the wilderness’ to be the party’s fate. 

As long as you are a MP and remain in the JLP, the media has every right to hound you like a …………’mek mi tek it easy yahso’.  The media has every right to pursue you and if I were a journalist, I would make it my point of duty to stick the tape recorder and mike in your face and boi oh boi would I love for you to touch me.


 

‘Warmy’ and the media: A long-standing conflict

Warmington says journalists are deliberately pestering him to make news reports

(Jamaica Observer)Sunday, August 16, 2015     31 Comments

 
 
  

WARMINGTON… I keep saying, leave me alone, and they just keep on and on.

“The Press is full of s..t,” St Catherine South Western Member of Parliament Clifford Everald Warmington, told the Sunday Observer last Friday.

Responding to questions about his “bad press” last week, triggered by two confrontations with the media, Warmington suggested that journalists are deliberately pestering him to make news reports.

“I keep saying, leave me alone, and they just keep on and on,” the MP said in response to questions about his behaviour, which brought renewed calls from the Press Association of Jamaica (PAJ) and the public for the Jamaica Labour Party (JLP) to discipline him.

“Like what? They don’t own the party,” was how Warmington reacted to suggestions that he should be sanctioned.

It is not strange for him and the media to be at war, but it is not strange either that despite this bad relationship he still makes the headlines with views which, according to the Opposition legislator, are often representative of the average Jamaican even when they run against the grain of political discipline.

“It doesn’t affect me within my constituency, and I am only answerable to my constituents,” he said.

Warmington is a seasoned and expressive figure in Parliament, who never fears speaking his mind, or even insisting that he be allowed to speak, often against the ruling of the Speaker for him to desist.

The Gordon House Press has also felt his wrath as he has demonstrated over the years that he is a stickler for all to adhere to the rules of Parliament. Warmington has been responsible for the Marshall removing ill-clad journalists from the Press Box, or interfering with any development in the box which might be considered contrary to the rules of the Lower House.

His colleagues in the legislature, including from his own party, are regularly peeved when he applies one of his now famous tactics of introducing statutory issues, which can halt proceedings.

Warmington has chaired the Constituency Development Fund (CDF), which provides funding for programmes submitted by the MPs for improvements in their constituencies.

He was born in Brown’s Hall, St Catherine, which is also Prime Minister Portia Simpson Miller’s place of birth, in fact, it has been accepted in Gordon House that he is a cousin of Simpson Miller.

Warmington was first elected to the House of Representatives in 1980 when he defeated Ruddy Lawson of the People’s National Party (PNP) by 9,727 votes to 6,088 in St Catherine South Western.

In 1983, when the then Opposition PNP did not contest the snap general elections, Warmington was replaced in the constituency by Douglas ‘Tony’ Golding, brother of former Prime Minister Bruce Golding.

Tacius Golding, a former Speaker of the House and patriarch of the Golding family, held the seat from 1949 to 1967, while his son, Bruce, held it for one term (1972-76).

The PNP’s Lawson became MP in 1976, defeating Bruce Golding.

However, after the 1980 and 1983 elections the seat swung back to Lawson in 1989, when he defeated Michael Williams (current general secretary of the National Democratic Movement (NDM).

Warmington returned in 1993, but was defeated again by Lawson. He lost again in 1997 to the PNP’s Jennifer Edwards who was, up to recently, executive director of the National Solid Waste Management Authority. But Warmington regained the seat in 2002 from Edwards and has held it since.

His long political career has been marred by constant conflicts with the media.

In 2010, he threatened to bar the media from covering meetings of the CDF while he was chairman.

The situation was not helped by his “go to hell” response to a CVM news presenter in March 2011.

The two events which occurred last week at the JLP’s Belmont Road headquarters in St Andrew when he pushed the camera of an intern away from him and when he gave the crowd, including some JLP supporters and journalists who were in attendance, “the finger”, have only served to increase his conflict status with the media.

 

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Ignorance ‘Tun Up Til It Tun Ova’- Burn Up The Ambulance

I am fortunate I am not one of the workers as I can tell you, ‘from dem bun up di ambulance, I wouda tek wey mi self from dat deh scene.  At mi yard I wouda flash an listen to di news.  Wedda mi a doctor, nurse, porter or sweeper, mi wouda surely lose di wok, as mi neighna tandeh’.

This is what I call lunacy stemming from ignorance.  We all have a right to demonstrate if we feel moved to do so.  However, there is a thin line between demonstrating as a civil society versus demonstrating like a criminal.  What puzzles me on this reporting is that the firefighters were prevented from outing the burning ambulance?  Where was the Police?  Tear gas does not exist anymore?  Who is going to pay for the replacement of the ambulance?  Who cares that there are shortages of ambulances, police vehicles etc?  When the very same ‘fools’ who burn up the ambulance is in need, I guess they will return to demonstrating, this time against themselves. 

It is not easy to lead fools and idiots and that is why our battle will always be an uphill one with more failures than successes on the Roc.


 

UPDATE: Residents torch ambulance as Westmoreland unrest continues

(Jamaica Observer) Saturday, August 15, 2015 | 11:46 AM     40 Comments 

 
  File photo

WESTMORELAND, Jamaica — The management of the Sav-la-Mar General Hospital in Westmoreland says services are still limited as tension is still running high in the town following a shooting incident Friday night which left two people dead.

The Western Regional Health Authority (WRHA) said an ambulance, which has been out of use, was burnt by protestors and that firefighters were prevented from putting out the blaze.

“Staff of the hospital continue to be adversely affected by the unrest which has spilled over onto the hospital compound and understandably there is fear among our healthcare workers,” WRHA Chairman Calvin Brown said.

“The situation is such that only limited services are currently available in Accident and Emergency; this will obtain until we are satisfied that the problem in the town has been brought under control by the authorities and it is safe for our workers to resume normality,” said Brown.

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Need I Say More – ‘4 Pickininies Roun A Back Rd, AKA – Whore Rd’

During the late 1990’s this location infamously known as ‘Back Rd’ was a tranquil zone where one could choose to dine on some fine sea food while enjoying the calming effects of the Ocean during sunset and beyond.  The array of eateries was enticing and a liming spot truly that zone was.  Yes, there were one or two spots where you know the usual rendezvous would take place, but certainly not on the level to where it has matured to now. From what I understand, no sooner than the ‘cock crow’ until you say when, the display of human flesh in all shapes, sizes, and ages are advertising their services for as low as J$500.00.

It is an entirely different kind of menu I understand and so it should be no surprise that illicit activities will occur considering the exponential growth that has taken place from the 1990’s to present.  What we must not fail to act on is the reality that the children who did not just drop out of the sky are at grave risk and danger.

Again I ask, when are we going to tackle the root cause?  When we cry out to government, we are in effect asking for more taxation as who exactly do you think pay for the welfare of unwanted children?


 

4 children in custody following ‘Back Road’ operation — Police

(Jamaica Observer)Saturday, August 15, 2015 | 3:58 PM  

 
 
 
 
 

File photo

KINGSTON, Jamaica — Members of the security forces were out in droves to carry out pre-dawn operations on the Port Henderson main road in Portmore, St Catherine on Saturday.

A media release from the Jamaica Constabulary Force’s Corporate Communications Unit said that the focus of the operation was on human trafficking, lottery scamming, search for illegal firearms and ammunition and dangerous drugs.

Police reports are that during the operation, which began about 3:00 am, 14 offensive weapons and two motor vehicles were seized. Police interviewed 200 females, while 166 males were detained for further questioning.

Approximately 250 members of the military and police formations were on location to carry out the operations. Among those detained were four children, who were taken into custody by members of the Centre for the Investigation of Sexual Offences and Child Abuse.

 

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How Does A Customer Steal Insurance Cover Notes????

Can an investigation or can a journalist do a cover story on improprieties at Insurance Companies?  How does this happen?

From my own experience in attending insurance companies as a customer, I hardly see it possible to just rummage through paperwork on employees desk and make away with stolen cover notes.  Who would be in a position to have such documentation?  Is there a profit to be made in selling the notes?

It is said that many will not seek employment unless there is an opportunity to ‘hustle’ whilst on the job.  I like to define the ‘hustle’ as being ‘legitimate hustle’ or ‘tiefing hustle’.  For clarity, any ’hustle’ you cannot mention to your employer if  asked if you supplement your income is most definitely a ‘tiefing hustle’.  I see where security cameras must be installed in every department including the rest rooms.  Privacy outside of your abode may soon be challenged.  What a life?


 

Several BCIC cover notes stolen

(Jamaica Observer) Saturday, August 15, 2015 | 11:57 AM    

 
 
 KINGSTON, Jamaica — The British Caribbean Insurance Company is reporting the theft of several of its cover notes.

The notes bearing serial numbers 1630101-1630150, BCIC said in an advertisement, were looted this week.

BCIC is advising that it will be of no use if given to, or accepted by any member of the public and adds that it accepts “no responsibility for the series of notes mentioned above”. In the meantime, BCIC is asking that the cover notes be returned to any of its offices or a police station, if found or issued.

 

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